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GENERAL SUTTER

GENERAL SUTTER
GENERAL SUTTER
SKU: 2GENERAL SUTTER
General Sutter ? BACK Johann August Sutter was born in Kandern in Baden on February 23, 1803. He was an adventurer and colonizer. General Sutter, as he was generally known, was forced to flee his creditors in Switzerland at the age of 30. Ten years later, in California, he was the ruler of the Sacramento Valley, founder of New Helvetia, a small sovereign. After the discovery of gold on his land he lost everything. Gold was his ruin. He never recovered from the loss of his property. In California, Suttter worked on cultivation of grains, crops that had been almost completely neglected due to lack of irrigation. The present properity of the Sacramento Valley is largely a result of his foresight. Some dates in Sutter's life remain unclear. He lived for a while in the Swiss canton of Basel-Landschaft, served in the Swiss Army, was promoted to the rank of captain, incurred debts and had to flee. In 1826, he married Anna Duebel, and they had three sons and a daughter. In 1834, he came to New York. In the next few years, he joined trappers in Oregon, visited Vancouver and the Hawaiian Islands, but always was attracted by Eldorado, or California. In July of 1839, he arrived in San Francisco, where he soon made a fortune. Only a few days after his arrival (California at that time still belonged to Mexico), he presented the Mexican Governor, Alvarado, with a bold plan for founding a colony in the unexplored north on the southern bank of the American River, where it joins the Sacramento River. The governor granted him a vast tract of land where Sutter planted orchards, vineyards and grain and began to build extensive irrigation projects. In June 1841, the governor visited Neuve Helvetio, as Sutter called his kingdom, and conferred Mexican citizenship upon him. The success of Sutter's enterprise was phenomenal. He was considered the richest and most respected citizen of California, and became known as General Sutter. His fortune changed when nuggets of yellow metal were found on his land by James W Marshall in January 24, 1848. News of the discovery of gold quickly spread through the entire colony, despite Sutter's effort to keep the discovery a secret. All his men fled, and thousands of gold prospectors overran his land, destroying fields, harvest, buildings and became squatters. Sutter who salvaged little, fled. "Even my millstones were stolen", he later told Bancroft. He spent the next years making petitions to the federal government in Washington, which granted him a modest pension. In 1864, the legislature of California also granted him a monthly stipend of $250. In 1871, he bought a house in Lititz, Pennsylvania, in the village of the Moravian Brothers. He continued to spend winters in Washington where he died on June 18, 1880. More has been written about Sutter than about any other German-American (Sutter himself usually claimed to be Swiss). After decades of obscurity, several books about his life were published. The first of these, Blaise Cendrars "L'or; la merveilleuse histoire du general Johann August Sutter,"" appeared in 1925 and was a distorted biography that became the source for numerous subsequent literary treatments in German of Sutter's life. Among these are Stefan Zweig's "The Discovery of Eldorado", "Ballade of Fort Sutter", by Egon Erwin Kisch, and "The History of General Johann August Sutter", by Caesar von Arx. Bruno Frank's "The General and the Gold" was also based on Cendrars. E. W. Moeller, in his "Califonia Tragedy", portrayed Sutter as a kind of crusader for his rights, while Arx depicted Sutter quite wrongly as a con-man and gambler. In 1876, the well-known historian, Herbert H. Bancroft, visited Sutter, who was ill, to have him dictate his autobiography. Bancroft's corrected notes were used as the source for "New Helvetia -- Memoirs of General Johann August Sutter", published by Erwin Gustav Gudde in Leipzig in 1934. Two years earlier, D.S. Watson had published "The Diary of Johann August Sutter" in San Francisco. Both works are considered reliable. The historian Bancroft made the most objective assessment of Sutter's importance in American history. Civil War general, William T. Sherman, observed in his eulogy on Sutter that "of all men who played a role in reaching California, we owe its permanent possession primarily to General Sutter". This cigar label biography from http://www.gymmuenchenstein.ch/stalder/klassen/amhist/sutter.htm
Quality: Mint
Topics: Americana
Company:  Johnson's 10 Cent cigars
Size:  4"x4"
Price: $50.00